NEWS RELEASE: City/Cité

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2015

NEWS RELEASE FRENCH/U.S. EXCHANGE DIGS INTO COMMON URBAN PROBLEMS OF INEQUALITY, RACE U of C and UIC Host First of 3 Events Set For Chicago, Detroit & Paris

CHICAGO - Ten years after the great uprising of its suburbs, France is still facing inequalities, poverty and religious radicalization issues. At the same time, the United States is torn by escalating tensions between minority communities and police as it wrestles with a divisive immigration-policy debate. Within this framework, leading scholars, policymakers, researchers, community organizers, activists and artists from both sides of the Atlantic will be in Chicago Tuesday and Wednesday, November 3-4 to explore inequality, race and the state of urban democracy in the United States and France.

Presented by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, the University of Chicago and the Great Cities Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago, the symposium, "City/Cité: A Transatlantic Exchange" begins in Chicago, with the first of two days on the University of Illinois Chicago campus and the next day on the University of Chicago campus. Following the Chicago event, the program will move next year to Detroit and, finally, to Paris.

"We are bringing together scholars, researchers, artists, policymakers, activists and a range of grassroots voices from the United States and France to discuss key urban issues shaping life today in both countries," said Teresa L. Córdova, director, Great Cities Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago. "We intend to stimulate a dialogue and debate about what are the root causes and how we can go about finding and implementing solutions in an era of austerity."

The goal is to retain a local focus, while seeking to link local circumstances to broader issues and trends shaping cities on both sides of the Atlantic.

"At the interpretive heart of each session are common issues facing urban spaces in both countries," said Andrew Diamond, the program’s curator and a professor of American history and civilization at Paris-Sorbonne University. "They include the lingering conditions of inequality and discrimination blocking paths to social mobility, the possibilities for neighborhood renewal in an era of austerity, the challenges of building bonds of trust and solidarity between different urban communities, and the often precarious interface between citizens and their local governments in an era of increasing tensions between communities and the police."

"For many years, French researchers, activists, and community organizers have looked across the Atlantic at the American urban experience to better understand our own issues of race and inequality," said Fabrice Rozié, Cultural attaché at the cultural service at the French Consulate in Chicago. "City/Cité developed out of such circumstances and seeks to create an ongoing two-way exchange of ideas between academics, policymakers and community leaders engaged in better understanding and addressing the social and racial inequalities that both nations face today."

A keynote address will be given each day: on Tuesday by Thomas J. Sugrue, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History at New York University, a specialist in 20th-century American politics, urban history, civil rights and race; and on Wednesday by Mary Pattillo, Northwestern University Professor of Sociology and African American Studies.

Pattillo’s areas of interest include race and ethnicity, the black middle class, policy, inequality, urban sociology and qualitative methods. Pattillo uses the city of Chicago as her laboratory and strives to be an expert in Chicago history, politics and social life. Sugrue is currently engaged in a research project on race, ethnicity and citizenship in France and the United States.

"We want to facilitate dynamic, generative discussions on the current state of urban democracy in the United States and France," said Robert Chaskin, Professor and Deputy Dean at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and Director of the university’s Urban Network, a co-sponsor of the event. "Rather than a series of formal presentations, each session adopts a roundtable approach that includes perspectives from scholars, policymakers, activists, and practitioners and enables the members of what we hope will be a diverse audience, including civil society actors and members of the media, to interact fluidly with panelists. We are looking forward to a lively and enlightening two days."

For a complete agenda and to RSVP go to www.citycite2015.eventbrite.com

University of Illinois Agenda
9:00 a.m Welcome, Introductions and Opening Remarks
9:30 a.m. Employment and Community Development in an Era of Austerity
11:15a.m. Keynote: "City/Cité: The Urgency of a Transatlantic Exchange,"
Thomas Sugrue
1:00 p.m. Building Bonds of Trust Across Racial and Ethnic Lines
3:00 p.m. The Sociology of Community: Neighborhoods in Transition

University of Chicago Agenda
8:30 a.m. Welcome, Introductions and Opening Remarks
8:45 a.m. Keynote Address: "The Future of Black Metropolis,"
Mary Pattillo
10:00 a.m. Police-Community Relations in Transatlantic Perspective
1:00 p.m. Arts & Culture: Art and Community Engagement/Youth
Programs in the Arts
3:00 p.m. Racial Discrimination and Anti-Discrimination in the United States
and France

City/Cité: A Transatlantic Exchange is made possible through the generosity of Acsé (Agence nationale pour la cohésion sociale et l’égalité des chances), Institut français, Great Cities Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago, The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago and the France Chicago Center at the University of Chicago.

MORE INFORMATION:

CONTACT: LAURIE R. GLENN
PHONE: 773.704.7246
EMAIL: lrglenn@thinkincstrategy.com
###

Dernière modification : 02/11/2015

top of the page